ECV2020-133

PEEP in the pandemic: supporting parent learning on-line

Hannah Hale, University of Stirling, Scotland UK (h.c.hale@stir.ac.uk)
Elspeth McCartney, University of Stirling, Scotland UK (elspeth.mccartney@stir.ac.uk)
Muriel Mackenzie, Stirling Council, Scotland UK (mackenziem@stirling.gov.uk)
Joanna Rogerson, Stirling Council, Scotland UK (rogersonj@stirling.gov.uk)

Background: Practitioners trained by the charity PEEPLE run PEEP Learning Together programmes (PEEP-LTP) for child-with-parent groups, supporting families to develop effective evidence-based home-learning practices. There is evidence of parent self-reported developments in these areas. Recent COVID-19 restrictions have necessitated moving from face-to-face delivery to on-line approaches. Training and pilot materials are being developed by PEEPLE. Early adopters’ informal evaluations suggest on-line platforms accommodating larger participant groups are effective, that on-line delivery allows some parents to join groups more confidently than personal attendance, and that travel problems are avoided. There is however a loss of social interaction amongst parents and play opportunities for grouped children, and following up group audio-visual sessions with phone calls to embed learning is needed at times. Appropriate technology and security are problems for some families. Practitioners’ confidence or otherwise in using technology to communicate is varied.

Aim: This paper aims to survey and analyse local PEEP practitioners’ views of embarking upon on-line programme delivery and its impact on practitioners and families, to determine, share and adopt best-practice approaches.

Method: Around 50 Stirling Council PEEPs practitioners are completing on-line questionnaires, with some also interviewed, as part of a larger Stirling University/Stirling Council study of PEEP practice across the authority. Questions about the move to on-line delivery, its predicted opportunities and challenges, and what would sustain practitioners’ confidence are included. Responses to these questions will be summated and thematically analysed.

Results: Resulting themes will be collated and discussed. Practice is evolving, and whilst views similar to those of the early adopters may be elicited, additional unpredicted themes are also likely.

Conclusions: Implications for training, support and development to support practitioners in determining and adopting best-practice throughout the COVID-19 pandemic and beyond will be discussed.

Implications for children: Children rely on parents talking and playing with them to help them learn. This can be influenced by PEEP groups, and we will know how on-line PEEP delivery can help parents.

Implications for families: Children rely on you talking and playing with them to help them learn. This can be influenced by PEEP groups, and we will know how on-line PEEP delivery can help you.

Implications for practitioners: Children rely on their parents talking and playing with them to help them learn. This can be influenced by PEEP groups, and we will know how on-line delivery can help you support families.

Funding: University of Stirling and Stirling Council Evaluating Parent and Practitioner Views of Participation in the PEEP Learning Together Programme, and Delivering an Enhanced Delivery Model. Funder: Scottish Government ‘Equalities and Equity’ Small Grants Projects. 2020-2021, £39,064.

Key words: workforce issues, wellbeing, communication, community services, vulnerable communities, regional/rural communities, COVID-19, qualitative methods

This presentation relates to the following United Nations Sustainable Development Goals:

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