ECV2020-119

Using co-design to develop a tool for shared goal setting with parents in speech and language therapy

Ingrid Singer, HU University of Applied Sciences Utrecht, The Netherlands (ingrid.singer@hu.nl)
Inge Klatte, HU University of Applied Sciences Utrecht, The Netherlands (inge.klatte@hu.nl)
Rosa de Vries, HU University of Applied Sciences Utrecht, The Netherlands (rosa.devries@hu.nl)
Remko van der Lugt, HU University of Applied Sciences Utrecht, The Netherlands (remko.vanderlugt@hu.nl)
Ellen Gerrits, HU University of Applied Sciences Utrecht, The Netherlands (ellen.gerrits@hu.nl)

Background: The parent’s perspective of their child’s health and wellbeing is a core component of evidence-based practice (EBP) and family-centred care. In treatment programs for children with Developmental Language Disorders the role of parents is key and shared goal setting can lead to relevant outcomes for the child. However, speech and language therapists (SLTs) find it difficult to engage parents in meaningful conversations about the child’s communication problems in everyday life.

Aim: To develop a tool that helps SLTs to engage parents in an interview on concerns and priorities about their child’s communicative communication problems and in setting and evaluating functional therapy goals.

Method: The double diamond model served as the backbone of the project. Co-design techniques were used to discover SLTs’ needs, define the problem, develop ideas, and deliver a solution. SLTs (n=8) participated in all phases of the process. A prototype was developed and usability tested with SLTs (n=68) and parents (n=11). SLTs provided ratings of the tool on attractiveness, user friendliness, functionality, safety and affordability on a 10-point scale.  

Results: Facilitated group discussions resulted in the identification of functional, design and usability requirements of the instrument. Low-fi prototypes were developed and tested by participants. A functional prototype of the tool was developed and improvements on this prototype were made in several iterations during usability testing in real life interviews. This resulted in a tree like tool with discussion items written on ‘tree leaves’. The final tool, named ENGAGE, received ratings on attractiveness, user friendliness, functionality, safety and affordability of 7.6 to 8.4 out of max 10.

Conclusions: Drawing on SLTs knowledge and experience, the tool ENGAGE for shared goal setting with parents was developed, that looks and feels radically different from conventional questionnaires and stands out because of its functionality and user friendliness.

Implications for children: There is a new tool that helps you and your parents to tell speech and language therapists what is most important to work on during speech and language therapy.

Implications for families: ENGAGE is a new tool that helps you express your concerns and priorities about your child’s communication in everyday life. It assists in setting specific, functional goals to work on during speech and language therapy that lead to relevant outcomes for your child.

Implications for practitioners: The tool ENGAGE can assist you with engaging parents of a young child with DLD in shared goal setting, and goal evaluation. Participation of SLTs in the co-design process led to the development of a tool that supports an interview with parents in a natural way, even when parents’ health literacy or language command is low.

Funding: FNO grant no 101.353 (www.fnozorgvoorkansen.nl).

Key words: families’ voices, professionals’ voices, innovations, communication, qualitative methods

This presentation relates to the following United Nations Sustainable Development Goals:

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